Myofascial massage application in basic warm-up practices

Фотографии: 

Postgraduate student A.V. Losev1
PhD, Associate Professor V.Yu. Losev1
1Surgut State University, Surgut

Objective of the study was to rate benefits of the modern myofascial massage applied in the basic warm-up dynamic practices. Subject to the study were 20 athletes who practiced a test warm-up set (TWUS) including 5min jogging plus a dynamic warm-up set; versus the experimental dynamic warm-up set (EDWUS) including 5min jogging plus the same dynamic warm-up set supported by the myofascial massage elements. The study data and analyses showed benefits of the myofascial massage in combination with the dynamic warm-up set of exercises as verified by the trainees’ progress in the speed, strength and flexibility test rates. The tested benefits of the myofascial massage in combination with the dynamic warm-up set of exercises give the grounds for the model being recommended for application in training systems. It should be mentioned, however, that some aspects of the myofascial massage method need to be studied in more detail.

Keywords: dynamic warm-up, myofascial massage, volleyball.

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