Natural aeroionphytotherapy on trekking routes to improve adaptability resource

Dr.Med., Professor  I.I. Gaydamaka1
F.M. Khapaeva2, 3
PhD S.A. Pachin1
A.A. Stolyarov1
Dr.Med. N.K. Akhkubekova3
Dr.Med., Professor V.A. Utkin3
Dr.Med., Professor L.A. Cherevashchenko3
PhD N.P. Povolotskaya3
1Stavropol State Medical University, Ministry of Health of Russia, Stavropol
2Medical Institute of North Caucasus State Academy of Humanities and Technical Sciences, Cherkessk
3North Caucasus Federal Research and Clinical Center FMBA Russia, Essentuki

Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, adaptation, natural aeroionphytotherapy.

Background. Presently many researchers tend to believe that the irritable bowel syndrome is caused and aggravated, among other things, by the poor adaptability resource. It was also found that many external factors of influence (including the weather and environmental conditions) may be of negative effect on the efficiency of the therapeutic courses [1-3]. Of special interest in this context are benefits of a few new therapeutic courses with natural physical factors to complement the standard therapeutic methods for the irritable-bowel-syndrome-diagnosed patients – including the natural aeroionphytotherapeutic schemes known to be of special positive effects on adaptability.
Objective of the study was to rate benefits of the natural aeroionphytotherapy on trekking routes in the Essentuki Health Park for the adaptability improvement programs in application to the patients diagnosed with the irritable bowel syndrome.
Methods and structure of the study. The study with progress tests of the randomized sample of irritable-bowel-syndrome-diagnosed patients (n=118 who gave their informed written consent for the tests) – was run at the Essentuki Health Park. The sample was split up into three groups as follows.
Reference Group 1 (n=38) was treated by the standard resort sanatorium program including warm (35-36°C)  medium-mineralized (6-8 g/l) Essentuki-4 carbonic-chloride-bicarbonate sodium water (MW) in amounts of 3-3.5 ml/kg body weight, 30 minutes before meals, 3 times a day; carbon-dioxide warm 15-minute mineral water baths (CDMWB) once a day, with 8-10 baths per course; medicinal 100ml microclysters (10 per course); hydrocolonotherapy using AMOK-2A system and the same warm mineral water (1 l/min, 15 liters per procedure, 4 procedures per course with 2 days rest breaks); and dosed slow-pace (3-4km per hour) 2400m trekking sessions on Route-2.
Reference Group 2 (n=40), in addition to the above, was cured by myotropic spasmolytic trimebutin (100ml 3 times a day 30 min prior to meals, combined with the mineral water courses).
And Experimental Group (n=40) was cured by the natural aeroionphytotherapeutic course in addition to the above standard programs plus pharmaceutics; with the climatic and movement therapy dominated by dosed trekking tours with 5-10min aeroionphytotherapeutic sessions on therapeutic sites #1, 2 and 3 under the canopies of plant curtains of the Health Park in healthy microclimatic environments. The procedures were designed for discrete training effects with the trekking routes varied from 2400m to 7200m over the therapeutic course with the controlled slow-to-medium pacing.
Benefits of the therapeutic programs were rated by the GSRS (Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale) developed by by Wiklund (1998) from the ASTRA Hassle Life Quality Research group. Progress tests to rate the adaptability in the sample were run using LOTOS (Saint Petersburg made) test system to produce biorhythmograms and obtain the following: vegetative regulation index by the heart rate variation analy-sis; neurohumoral regulation index by neurodynamic analysis; psycho-emotional state index by the brain biorhythms mapping procedure; and the adaptability rate by the fractal analytical method; with the set of the above indicators being combined to produce the combined health rate. Used for the statistical analysis were the modern nonparametric STATISTICA v.6.0 and SADQO v.8.1 toolkits plus the standard Mi-crosoft Excel Office-2003 statistical tools, with the differences in the data arrays rated significant at p<0.05.
Results and discussion. The pre- versus post-experimental tests showed health and adaptability im-provements in most of the sample: see Table 1.

Table 1. Pre- versus post-experimental adaptability test rates of the sample

Test rates, %

Groups

Tests

Values

Statistical rates

Median (M)

Error (m)

Meaning rate

Wilcoxon W-criterion of randomness

Fischer’s dispersion

Student's t-distribution under the null hypothesis

 

Vegetative regulation index

EG

Pre-exp.

30,17

3,25

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

55,39

3,95

RG1

Pre-exp.

29,39

3,86

p < 0,005

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

42,25

4,29

RG2

Pre-exp.

30,54

4,87

p < 0,038

p < 0,006

no

p < 0,007

Post-exp.

38,96

4,90

Neurohumoral regulation index

EG

Pre-exp.

28,82

3,55

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

44,43

2,78

RG1

Pre-exp.

23,25

3,43

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

35,39

3,88

RG2

Pre-exp.

25,18

4,46

p < 0,005

p < 0,004

no

p < 0,003

Post-exp.

32,14

4,06

Psycho-emotional state index

EG

Pre-exp.

28,36

3,34

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

47,68

2,61

RG1

Pre-exp.

25,00

3,42

p < 0,007

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

35,21

3,31

RG2

Pre-exp.

28,32

4,37

p < 0,021

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,005

Post-exp.

33,68

3,83

Adaptability rate

EG

Pre-exp.

28,89

3,35

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

44,57

3,84

RG1

Pre-exp.

26,54

4,80

no

p < 0,021

no

no

Post-exp.

28,07

4,00

RG2

Pre-exp.

27,25

4,88

no

p < 0,005

no

p < 0,05

Post-exp.

30,82

4,48

Combined health rate

EG

Pre-exp.

29,07

3,23

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

48,21

2,99

RG1

Pre-exp.

25,32

3,29

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

34,71

3,55

RG2

Pre-exp.

26,86

4,34

p < 0,002

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

33,79

4,14

 

Thus the vegetative regulation index in the EG was tested to significantly (p<0.001) grow versus the RG1 and RG2 where the progress was less expressed (p<0.005 and p<0.038 respectively). The Fischer’s dispersion was found insignificant, and we used the Student's t-distribution under the null hypothesis. The pre- versus post-experimental test rates of the EG showed significant (at least p<0.02) progress in every test. Despite the fact that we found many deviations from a normal distribution, the Student t-criterion was found insignificant only for the adaptability rate progress in RG1 being significant (at least p<0.05) in all other cases. The post-experimental combined health rate in the EG was tested to grow 1.66 times versus the pre-experimental ones (p<0,001); versus 1.37 times in RG1 (p<0.001); and 1.26 times in RG2 (p<0.002).
Furthermore, the EG was tested with progress in the clinical health test rates. Thus the pain syndrome in the EG was tested to fall 4.66 times (p<0.001) versus 2.15 times in RG1 (p<0.001) and 1.51 times in RG2 (p<0.001); constipation syndrome was tested to fall 3.08 times (p<0.001), 2.23 times (p<0.001) and 1.70 times (p<0,001); and the dyspeptic syndrome was tested to fall 3.85 times (p<0.001), 2.35 times (p<0.001) and 1.53 times (p<0.001), respectively.

Table 2. Pre- versus post-experimental clinical health test rates of the sample

Test rates

Groups

Tests

Values

Statistical rates

Median (M)

Error (m)

Significance rate

Wilcoxon W-criterion of randomness

Fisher’s dispersion

Student's t-distribution under the null hypothesis

 

Pain syndrome

EG

Pre-exp.

6,531

0,009

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

1,401

0,010

RG1

Pre-exp.

6,051

0,030

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

2,811

0,010

RG2

Pre-exp.

6,363

0,062

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

4,200

0,013

Constipation syndrome

EG

Pre-exp.

7,315

0,009

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

2,372

0,007

RG1

Pre-exp.

6,950

0,007

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

p < 0,004

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

3,110

0,004

RG2

Pre-exp.

7,227

0,010

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

4,242

0,009

Dyspeptic syndrome

EG

Pre-exp.

5,278

0,006

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

1,375

0,005

RG1

Pre-exp.

5,349

0,007

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

Post-exp.

2,270

0,007

RG2

Pre-exp.

5,222

0,007

p < 0,001

p < 0,001

no

p < 0,001

 

Correlation analysis of the combined health test rates versus the clinical health symptoms found the fol-lowing statistically significant correlations: combined health rate growth was correlated with the pain syndrome falls (r=-0.51; p<0.025); growth of the bowel movement per week rate (r=+0.46; p<0.025); and falls in the irritable-bowel-syndrome days for the 12-month survey period (r=-0.41; p<0.026). The EG progress was attributed to the natural aeroionphytotherapeutic course and its minor-to-moderate-intensity healthy irritants with their anti-stressor effects (as provided by the theory of unspecific adaptability re-sponses [6]) associated with the protective mechanisms activation and adaptability resource building ef-fects.
Conclusion. The natural aeroionphytotherapeutic course to complement the traditional climatic and physi-cal training therapy – as verified by the course piloting experiment at Essentuki Health Park – was found to significantly improve the irritable-bowel-syndrome-diagnosed patients’ conditions with the significant progress in the adaptability rates due to activation of the bio-regulatory mechanisms.

References

  1. Kaysinova A.S., Tekeeva F.I., Prosolchenko A.V., Kazaryan T.S. Sanatorno-kurortnoe lechenie bolnykh s sindromom razdrazhennogo kishechnika [Health resort treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome]. Kurortnaya meditsina. 2015. no. 2. pp. 104-107.
  2. Povolotskaya N.P., Efimenko N.V., Kortunova Z.V. et al. Prirodnaya aeroionofitoterapiya bolnykh ishemicheskoy boleznyu serdtsa na nizkogornykh kurortakh: Usovershenstvovannaya meditsinskaya tehnologiya (reg. udostoverenie # FS-2006/330-u ot 14 noyabrya 2006 ) [Natural aeroionophytotherapy of patients with coronary heart disease in low-mountain resorts: Advanced medical technology (reg. certificate No. FS-2006/330 from November 14, 2006)]. Pyatigorsk: PGNIIK publ., 2006. 16 p.

Corresponding author: koru@yandex.ru

ABSTRACT
Objective of the study was to rate benefits of the natural aeroionphytotherapy (on trekking routes at Essentuki Health Park for the adaptability resource improvement programs in application to the patients diagnosed with the irritable bowel syndrome. Sampled for the study were the irritable-bowel-syndrome-diagnosed people split up into Reference Group 1 (n=38) treated by the standard resort sanatorium program (Essentuki mineral water for external and internal administration, micro-clysters, hydrocolonotherapy); Reference Group 2 (n=40) additionally cured by myotropic spasmolytic trimebutin; and Experimental Group (n=40) cured by the natural aeroionphytotherapeutic course in addition to the above standard programs plus pharmaceutics. The health test data and comparative analysis showed benefits of the natural aeroionphytotherapeutic course, with the Experimental Group combined health rates tested to grow 1.66 times (p<0.001) versus 1.37 times in Reference Group-2 (p<0.001) and 1.26 times in Reference Group-1 (p<0.002); with the Reference Group-1 and Reference Group-2 further diagnosed with quite complex variations in the test parameters and dispersions.